October 20, 2013: It's All What You Make of It


Sunday was a dreary day in Denver. Rain, cold, wind. Almost snow. We were moving at a slow pace and I was to catch a flight home to Omaha. I would rather hang with Garrett, watching the Broncos game, or sit in my own comfy living room with the warmth of my dog and fireplace. Instead I would be hanging with TSA.

After a gloomy drive to the airport, I received a text indicating my flight was delayed. As flight times typically wander back and forth from later, back to earlier; we decided to stick with the original drop off time. Airport delay time was anticipated.

I had a choice. Albeit, not a very big choice. But a choice, nonetheless. I could choose to be annoyed with my less than desirable situation or I could make the most of it. I chose the latter.

Note that I'm not pounding my chest or pointing out a superior quality. A good friend and mentor continues to remind me that happiness is a choice. Which would lead to the alternative presumption; that unhappiness is a choice as well.

I have learned over the years that being unhappy during uncontrollable situations is a colossal waste of time. Some of my best my interactions have happened while experiencing an equally crappy situation with someone sharing the same positive perspective.

Although I wasn't happy with the final Broncos outcome, I made many friends at the Denver airport as I sported my coveted Peyton Manning jersey. A delayed flight = a beer at the bar? Absolutely. I quickly found out that the guys squeezed in next to me were waiting for the same delayed flight. We could see our gate from the window in front of us, so our departure was planned to the minute.

This enabled me to enjoy my beer and gumbo while watching the incoming planes out of my left eye and the Broncos game out of my right. The interactions were enjoyable. My waitress was a kind, hard-working woman.

After leaving a good tip and a taking trip to the bathroom, I made some friends in the Southwest boarding line. Although I typically keep to myself in-flight, the elderly woman next to me wanted to talk. So I chatted with her and found that we had mutual friends in her hometown of Onawa.

The young man sitting next to her joined in our conversation of small talk. He reminded me of a business acquaintance. I instantly liked him. With two small kids at home, he shared with us the I-Pad app he used to teach his daughter the alphabet. And then he gladly took the free drink ticket I offered him.

Sixty-five minutes later we were "wheels down" in Omaha. Not a bad flight at all. Actually the entire evening was quite enjoyable. It's all what you make of it.

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